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Fun with Fondue is our monthly newsletter filled with fondue tips and ideas.

Step One
Determine what types of fondue you can have with your pot
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Step Two
Use the top menu to browse through our best fondue recipes
Have fun!

Fondue Oil

When having an oil-based fondue or fondue bourguignonne, you need to choose your fondue oil and many other things. So go ahead and decide which type of meat and/or veggies to have and check this chicken fondue recipe, beef fondue bourguignonne or pork meatball fondue recipe.

You can always prepare some side dishes to have with your fondue. Rice and salad are always great sides that go with almost anything.

Don't forget to have a selection of fondue dips for your guests. I recommend that you have at least three different dips to choose from.

Now, let's discuss the types of fondue oil you can use with this kind of fondue.


Types of Fondue Oil

There are many types of fondue oil that can be used in fondue bourguignonne or hot oil fondue. Here is a list of the most common types of fondue oil:

Try to stick to peanut oil or canola oil. Other oils have lower smoking points.


Equipment for Oil Fondue

You must use a copper, stainless steel or cast iron fondue pot for oil fondue. The other types of fondue pots are NOT designed to be used with hot fondue oil and could present a safety hazard and even crack under the high heat.

DO NOT use ceramic or stoneware pots.

Traditional pots use a burner of some sort but lots of electric fondue pots are now available. If possible, choose a pot with splash guards or some curvature at the top to prevent hot oil splatters.

If your pot is not equipped with anything that could prevent oil splatter, do not fill it to more than 1/2 capacity.


How to Prepare Oil Fondue

You will need to select tender meat cuts such as tenderloin or sirloin and trim all visible fat and remove all sinew. A typical person will eat about 0.2 kg of meat (about 6 to 7 onces).

fondue pot

Cut the pieces into bite-sized servings (i.e., 2 cm wide cubes or 3/4 inch wide) and blot your meat with paper towel or some other absorbent material. Always keep your meat refrigerated until you're ready to eat and if you're serving different types of meat, keep them separated to prevent contamination or salmonella.

It's easier to heat up the oil on the stove but you have to be extremely careful when pouring the hot oil into the fondue pot. Fill the fondue pot to 1/2 or 2/3 of its capacity and ensure that it's located where it won't be knocked over.

Everyone should be able to easily reach the pot to dip their forks into it. If your fondue pot has a handle, make sure that it's out of the way to prevent a sleeve from getting caught around it. If you are using an electric pot, make sure the cord is safely out of everyone's way.

Heat up the oil until it reaches about 180 to 190 Celsius (about 350 to 375 Fahrenheit). If you don't have a deep-fying thermometer, you can test the oil temperature using a piece of bread. Simply drop it into the oil when you think the temperature is right and wait to see how long it takes for the bread to turn golden brown and float back to the surface. If it's about 30 seconds or less, then your oil is ready.

Your guests can now place a piece of meat on a fork and dip it into the hot oil. Your meat will cook within a minute or so. Be careful with chicken or meatballs to ensure that the meat is cooked through.

Always let your meat or veggies cool off on your fondue plate before eating them and keep in mind that the fondue fork will be extremely hot! Use a regular fork to eat and only use the fondue fork for the actual cooking

Dip your cooled-off meat or veggies into one of your oil fondue dips and enjoy!


Oil Fondue Recipes

You can find a variety of hot oil fondue recipes on the left of this page. Try one at your next fondue party.


Tips for Dealing with Fondue Oil

Are you ready for your hot-oil fondue? Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Keep your meat and vegetables dry before dipping them in hot oil. Water increases splattering.
  • Do not add salt to your meat or veggies before dipping them into the oil as salt clouds the oil.
  • Do not overfill the pot with oil. Filling it to 1/2 or 2/3 of its capacity is plenty.
  • Never move a pot filled with hot oil and be careful with electric pots. The cord could get in the way.
  • Always let your meat and veggies cool off before eating them.
  • If too many forks are in the fondue pot at once, the oil temperature will quickly cool off. One fork per guest is ideal.

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